Tag Archives: Boston

I’m just Tired of Violence

Standard

I had just witnessed the Boston Red Sox beat the Tampa Bay Rays and decided to cool off by taking a shower. When I finished my shower, my phone was ringing; my dad asked “What’s going on in Boston? I heard there were explosions at the Boston Marathon?” As someone trying to get in shape, I was furious that some idiots attempted to hurt runners who had just ran 26 miles. As someone who loves history, I was upset that some idiots tried to ruin a celebration of Massachusetts’ involvement in the Revolutionary War. As a human, I am sad that someone decided to injure and kill innocent people.

I don’t know what’s going on, no one does. There were two explosions around 3 P.M. at the Boston Marathon finish line. Some thought it was a possible chemical leak, but now reports are saying that police have uncovered several other bombs. The police found one bomb under bleachers and purposely set it off when no one was around. John F. Kennedy Library might have a bomb. Three people are reported dead, dozens more injured. At 4:08: the official report is 2 dead, 22 injured in blasts. No terrorist group has come forward yet, so it might just be some loner who did this. Someone who is upset at the world. Someone who hates America. Someone who hates everything…

I’m tired of seeing terrorist attacks. When I was in 7th grade, I saw people fall to their deaths from the World Trade Center. I remember the planes flying into the towers, the Pentagon, and into the field – but seeing a bodies falling to their deaths is an image I’ll never get out of my head. Then the reports of attacks overseas involving America’s allies in Europe made me thankful for the Atlanta Ocean separating America from the Middle East and Africa – terrorists would have to board a plane to get here and security at the airport is very, very strict. But Boston shows that sometimes there is nothing we can do to prevent attacks – there is always going to be an upset person trying to bring everyone down to his level.

America has been gun-crazy since the Sandy Hook elementary shooting – one side gather their guns while the other side tries to take the guns. And you know what? Both sides are WRONG. I said months ago that guns aren’t the problem nor are the bombs, it’s the people. The politicians have been spending all their time dealing with guns that they forgot about People – People Kill People. It’s the People who are uneducated that are more likely to be violent, yet the education budgets are always being cut. It’s the People who suffer from mental illness that are more likely to be involved in a mass attack, yet health care doesn’t cover the costs of all the help they need. It’s the People upset that America is involved in international conflicts, yet war continues to wage on (and for what?). Instead of wasting time fighting over guns, abortion, and other controversial laws that don’t do much good for society, how about America comes together to make sure that something like this won’t happen again, to make sure more children don’t grow up to be disgruntled adults pissed at society.

 

Advertisements

Abigail Adams: Founding Woman

Standard

Abigail Adams by Benjamin Blythe, 1766

Abigail Adams by Benjamin Blythe, 1766 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In history classes, the American children learned about the Founding Fathers, the political leaders who participated in the American Revolution and established the United States Constitution. They learn about George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and Benjamin Franklin… but why aren’t they taught about the Founding Women? The women who raised these men to become leaders and the wives of these men who gave them advice and the daughters of these men who took care of them as they grew old? It is because women worked behind the scenes, while the men gained all the glory. When 1,200 letters of the correspondence between President John Adams and Abigail Adams were found, it was discovered that John depended on his wife to take care of the house, the children, and he depended on her for advice.

Abigail Smith was born on November 22, 1744 in Weymouth, Massachusetts. Like many women at that time, Abigail never received formal education, however, her mother taught her and her sisters how to read and write. Abigail fell in love with reading, a trait that John Adams loved about her. The two married in 1764 and lived in Braintree, Massachusetts. When John’s law practice grew, he moved the family to Boston and traveled as a circuit judge, leading Abigail to take care of the four children.

In 1774, John went to Philadelphia to serve as his colony’s delegate to the First Continental Congress. At home, Abigail was appointed by Massachusetts Colony General Court to question Massachusetts women who were charged by their word or action of remaining loyal to the British crown; this was Abigail’s first government position. Since John was away most of the time, the two kept in touch by sending letters to each, 1,200 letters in fact. Through these letters, John usually asked for Abigail’s opinion and advice. She wrote to her husband requesting that he “Remember the Ladies, and be more generous and favorable to them than your ancestors. Do not put such unlimited power into the hands of the Husbands. Remember all Men would be tyrants if they could. If particular care and attention is not paid to the Ladies we are determined to formant a Rebellion, and will not hold ourselves bound by any Laws in which we have no voice, or Representation.” Sadly, the men did forget about the women.

In 1784, Abigail left her family, friends, and farm to join John at his diplomatic post in Paris. In 1785, she became wife of the first United States Minister to Great Britain. They returned to Massachusetts in 1788. When John Adams became Vice-President, she helped Martha Washington entertain guests in Philadelphia, the nation’s capitol at that time. When John became president, Abigail missed his inaugural ceremony in 1797 because she was talking care of his sick mother. Besides entertaining guests as the First Lady, Abigail was taking care of her 3-year-old granddaughter since her son, Charles, died from Alcoholism in 1800. As the First Lady, her controversial quotes and private letters, stolen from the mail system, were published in the newspapers. She was nicknamed “Mrs. President” because her advice asked her advice on everything, which at the time was amusing because a man asking a woman for help was not common. When John failed to become president for a second term, Abigail was happy to be done with the public life. The two finally were able to enjoy each other’s company until she died on October 28, 1818.

Abigail Adams, like many women at the time during the Revolutionary War, had to take care of the family and home while her husband was away during wartime. Since John was a politician, he was hardly ever home, leaving Abigail to raise the children. One of the children, John Quincy Adams, would become one of the greatest politicians of all time, including one term as President. Since his father was gone most of his childhood, it was Abigail ensuring that John and the rest of the children were educated. For John to ask his wife for advice concerning national and international affairs meant that Abigail was intelligent. Though he was teased for it, their relationship showed that the two truly loved each other for they trusted and listened to each other. John Adams and John Quincy Adams are considered two of the greatest politicians of American History thanks to Abigail’s guidance as a wife and mother.

Sources:

Abigail Smith Adams

First Lady Biography: Abigail Adams

Abigail Adams. biography

Anne Hutchinson: Preached Religious Freedom

Standard

Anne Hutchinson on Trial

Anne Hutchinson on Trial (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The United States is a melting pot – a place where all races, cultures, and religions live together. Though the U.S. is not perfect, it is still a land of opportunity and freedom, a promise to its civilians stated in the Bill of Rights. Before the Bill of Rights separated Church from the State, some settlements used religion to control the settlers. Immigration to the United States began in the early 1600’s for three main reasons: punishment, job opportunities, and religious freedom. When Anne Hutchinson left England for America, she was expecting a place to practice religion freely. Instead, she would be punished for being a woman discussing religion.

Anne Hutchinson was born in 1591 to Bridget Dryden and clergyman Francis Marbury. Her parents homeschooled her because they realized that women could also be educated, a belief made possible by Queen Elizabeth. England was a place of religious war between the Catholic Church and the Protestant Church, two churches that were equally corrupt. A group of Christians, called the Puritans, formed in order to “purify”religion. In 1612, Anne married a merchant named William Hutchinson and the couple became followers of minister John Cotton. Being a Puritan, Cotton was forced to leave the country so he followed other Puritans to the Massachusetts Bay Colony. In 1634, the couple and their 15 children sailed to America.

Hutchinson hoped that she would be able to practice religion freely, but when she arrived in Massachusetts, she realized that she would not be able to. The Puritan leaders wanted an utopia where everyone had to follow the strict teachings of the bible. She quickly organized weekly meetings for Boston women to discuss sermons privately in her own house, but her meetings became popular with women and men. Hutchinson believed women could take on roles of religious leadership, a role that went against the Puritan belief that women served their husbands and like Eve, women would lead men to damnation if allowed to form an opinion. She also questioned the orthodox ministers in the colony and believed one had to have faith to get into heaven; this belief went against the Puritan’s who believed every action performed should be for religious reasons. When she was not discussing religion, she was working as a midwife and helping needy women and children. Though Cotton and Hutchinson’s brother-in-law John Wheelwright were both preachers, it was Hutchinson who was viewed as the main threat because she was a woman.

In 1635, future governor John Winthrop wrote in his diary that Hutchinson was “ an American Jezebel, who had gone a-whoring from God.” Once he became governor in 1637, all liberal preachers were tried in court or brandished from the colony. Hutchinson was charged with “slandering the ministers” and “troubling the peace of the churches.” Though she had never spoken publicly against the mainstream Puritan ideology, she was sentenced to house arrest at the house of Joseph Weld, a brother of Reverend Thomas Weld. The house was two miles away from Boston, meaning Hutchinson was separated from her children. Her visitors included ministers collecting evidence against her. After four months of house arrest, she was brought back to court in March, 1638 and sentence to leave the town. Hutchinson, her family, and her followers moved to Aquidneck Island (later called Rhode Island) until the Puritans threatened the island. The family moved into Dutch territory, not realizing the tension with the Natives caused by Dutch governor William Kieft’s treason. On September 1642, Mohican Indians attacked Hutchinson’s house, killing her and five of her children. When her enemies found out, they were happy since they believed it was God punishing her.

The Untied States is now a place where one can practice religion freely, but at one time, the government had the power to punish those that disagreed with its views. Hutchinson was deemed a threat not only because she preached religious freedom, but because she was a woman. She worried Winthrop as soon as she moved into the colony so as soon as he became governor, he made it his mission to punish her. Hutchinson is a hero to all Americans, because it was people like her who made it possibly for Americans to live in a country not governed by religion. Meanwhile, the Puritans would go on to hang women in the Salem Witch Trials decades later and be a reminder of why religion should be separated from government.

Sources:

Anne Hutchinson Biography

Anne Hutchinson 

Reasons why the Second Amendment Exists

Standard

Due to the number of murders caused by guns, many in the United States wish to see the Second Amendment destroyed. To them, they

English: This is a photograph of the statue re...

 Captain John Parker s Kitson and erected in 1900. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

do not see why the common person needs to have a gun in a world where the public is protected by police and the army. In reality, the Second Amendment is one of the most important Amendments in the Constitution. It states “A Well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.” Though it can be translated into several different ways, it is believed by majority to mean that the common person has a right to own weapons for self-defense. Though the current American government was designed to protect the rights of its citizens, there was a time when Americans were forced to fight for their rights against the king who once protected them.

After numerous wars with its European neighbors, Great Britain needed money and began raising taxes in North America. The Townshend Acts were imposed on 1767; items being imported into the colonies were now taxed. The Americans became enraged that they could not represent themselves and began boycotting the Acts. The leaders asked the king for more protection from the colonists and in 1768, more British troops arrived in Boston. After the Boston Massacre and the Boston Tea Party, Parliament enacted the Intolerable Acts to punish the colonies, especially Massachusetts. In 1774, it abolished the provincial government of Massachusetts. On September 1774, the British removed gunpowder and other military supplies; to the colonists, this meant that the British were preparing to go to war with the defenseless colonists.

In 1775, it became known among the rebels that the British were heading to Concord to seize and destroy more military supplies. Concord secretly divided the supplies among near-by towns. On April 18, British troops embarked from boats in Boston and prepared to head to Concord to destroy the supplies and capture Sam Adams and John Hancock, the leaders of the rebels. Paul Revere and William Dawes were sent to warn the towns though only Samuel Prescott, a rebel that met along the way, made it to Concord. At Lexington, 80 militiamen led by Captain John Parker, met British Major John Pitcairn and the 700 British troops. “Stand your ground; don’t fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here” said Parker. Pitcairn demanded the troops lay down their arms but before the colonists could, a shot was fired. The colonists retreated after the quick scuffle – eight colonists were killed.

When the British arrived in Concord they found out that most of the supplies were gone. They decided to burn the small amount of supplies they found but the militiamen hurried to Concord’s North Bridge because they believed the whole town was being burned. These militiamen consisted of men from nearby towns (even from Connecticut) were known as “minute men” for their ability to get ready for a fight on a moment’s notice. Though the British fired first, it was they who ended up retreating. As many as 3,500 militiamen fired constantly for 18 miles, killing 250 redcoats. This was proof that the colonists could stand up to the most powerful army in the world.

When the United States Constitution was adopted on December 15, 1791, the Founding Fathers still remembered how the British were able to take over a town because the colonists could not defend themselves. They wanted to make sure that the common person would be ready to go to war in case the United States was ever under attacked. The Second Amendment was designed to ensure that if any enemy, including the government, threatened the American citizens, the citizens would be able to protect themselves.

Sources:

Battles of Lexington and Concord History Channel

Bill of Rights History Channel